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The Queer Arabs Posts

Episode 128 [in English]: Ado Ato Pictures

‘Queer in a Time of Forced Migration’ is three-part animated transmedia series by Ado Ato Pictures that follows the stories of LGBTQ refugees from Egypt, Sudan, and Saudi Arabia across continents and cultures — from the 2011 Revolutions in the Middle East and North Africa region to the world today.

Throughout the 2011 Egyptian Revolution, filmmaker Tamara Shogaolu and Egyptian journalist Nada El-Kouny collected more than 60 oral histories from women, LGBTQ individuals, as well as ethnic and religious minorities, with follow-up interviews conducted in Germany, the Netherlands, and Norway. The series documents arcs of hope, backlash, and displacement. 

The newly-released third part of the series “They Call Me Asylum Seeker,” is a web-based interactive experience narrated by Sudanese visual artist Ahmed Umar. 

We were honored to be joined by Tamara, Nada, and Ahmed to discuss their personal journeys with this work as well as the ways in which animation and interactive media formats can uniquely balance confidentiality and empathy-building with Western audiences.

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Episode 127 [in English]: Rebuilding Beirut With Pride


One month post-explosion, it remains crucial to #talkaboutlebanon, and support the ongoing project of relief, recovery, and rebuilding. This wonderful conversation with Danny from @rebuildingbeirutwithpride was initially shown as part of the @baylenfm House Arrest Digital Festival–but now you can listen on all of our podcast platforms too!

@rebuildingbeirutwithpride is a UK-based initiative raising funds to rebuild Beirut through the celebration of Queer Arab talent. As well as their recent performance event, they have been running an art auction at @rbp.auction. All proceeds are equally split and donated to the Lebanese Red Cross, Beit El Baraka , Basmeh & Zeitooneh and Embrace Lebanon,  as well as two grassroots LGBT+ crowdfunds. 

We discussed the goals of the project, how LGBTQ people have been particularly impacted following the explosion, and the importance of centering marginalized communities in rebuilding and reimagining better society.

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